The Holocaust: Why the Stories of the Survivors and Their Descendents Must Be Told Again and Again – And Why Every New Generation Must Listen

Today – Sunday 27th January 2013 – is International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Many will be writing and talking about it.

So why do I feel I must add my voice to theirs?

book cover image of "Auschwitz" by Laurence Rees
book cover image of “Auschwitz” by Laurence Rees

Because, over the years I’ve read many books on the Holocaust and by survivors and by survivors’ children. I’ve listened to their stories, and I’ve engaged emotionally with those stories.

The first book on the subject which I ever read was a novel,  “The Last of the Just” by Andre Schwartz-Bart. I remember, before I read that book (at the age of about 14), all I knew of the Holocaust was a vague knowledge gleaned from school history lessons. I must have mentally “sanitised” the information I received, because  I’d somehow got hold of the idea that only adults were killed, and that all babies and children were saved.

When I read “The Last of the Just”, I began to understand.

My journey of understanding has taken me through movies, TV programmes, books…

As the generations pass, there’s an ever-present temptation to put the Holocaust into the bin of “horrible things people have done to each other in the past” and to somehow shift off the responsibility to use it for self-examination.

This is why I believe that would be so dangerous: because the Holocaust gives us insights into our own nature as human beings: an inescapable truth that we all live with, in every generation.

The most compelling book I’ve ever read on this subject is “Auschwitz:  The Nazis and The ‘Final Solution'” by Laurence Rees (judged to be History Book of the Year in the British Book Awards 2006). The book was developed from a television series Rees wrote and produced.

Laurence Rees concludes with these words:

We must judge behaviour by the context of the times. And judged by the context of mid-twentieth-century, sophisticated European culture, Auschwitz and the Nazis’ ‘Final Solution’ represent the lowest act in all history….. Once allowed into the world, knowledge of what the Nazis did must not be unlearnt. It lies there – ugly, inert, waiting to be rediscovered by each new generation.

For the TV series and the book, Rees gathered testimonies from bystanders, perpetrators and victims, including revealing interviews with SS men and sundry European Fascists. It’s in this broad range of testimonies that Rees offers us a profound insight into human nature.

On page 261, Rees considers why so many went along with the horrors of the regime, and speculates that human nature is “elemental” – the realisation came in the camps that human beings resemble elements that are changeable according to temperature. Just as water exists as water only within a certain temperature range and is steam or ice in others, so human beings can become different people according to extremes of circumstance.

Rees makes the point that this is more than just the seemingly banal comment that human beings alter their behaviour according to circumstance… it is less a change in behaviour… and more a change in essential character.

His presentation of this led me to examine my own thoughts on the subject, in relation to my experience of life.

Over the years, the Holocaust has stood for me as the benchmark of pure evil, and Anti-Life.

But the other aspect of the Holocaust which particularly interests me, as a Christian, is the recurrent miracle of faith in God.

It has long been a source of great wonderment and awe for me, that there are those (not all, of course, by any means) who were caught up in, came through, and were subsequently affected by the Holocaust, who have not only held onto but have renewed and strengthened their faith in that loving and sovereign God.

When we consider the people  drowned in that vast tidal wave of suffering, we may feel overwhelmed and ask What can we do? How should we respond?

The answer they themselves gave, when they were able to, was, “When the War is over, tell our story to others.”

What they most wanted was that their stories should be told.

What we then choose to do with the knowledge these stories give us, is another matter: it may profoundly affect our future lives, on every level: or of course, it may not – according to what we choose to do with that knowledge.

But from my own standpoint as a novelist, I believe this is the first essential: let us keep listening to, and hearing, and engaging with, their stories, as they wished. To me, that is our duty to those who suffered, and the least we can do as fellow human beings.

Author: scskillman

I write contemporary thriller/suspense fiction. "Mystical Circles" is psychological suspense and "A Passionate Spirit" is a paranormal thriller. Both are available as paperbacks and as ebooks. To buy signed copies, go to my website www.scskillman.co.uk where you can order either or both using a secure PayPal link. I've also published a short non-fiction book "Perilous Path: A Writer's Journey", full of helpful tips, insights and reminders for writers.

7 thoughts on “The Holocaust: Why the Stories of the Survivors and Their Descendents Must Be Told Again and Again – And Why Every New Generation Must Listen

  1. Pingback: My Homepage
  2. Very good site you have here but I was wondering if you
    knew of any user discussion forums that cover the same topics
    talked about in this article? I’d really love to be a part of online community where I can get responses from other knowledgeable people that share the same interest. If you have any recommendations, please let me know. Many thanks!

  3. I agree that we should never forget what our ancestors suffered and were responsible for. We can’t simply pretend that bad things didn’t happen. It is better to remember them in a respectful way, and take what we can from the experiences of others.

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