Cornwall mini series Part 2: Watergate Bay

This is the second in a series of short reflections on places in north Cornwall.

There will be few words, and mainly images.

Early evening is a lovely time to be on a quiet beach. But today, we visit a beach in early morning.

Watergate Bay on the north Cornish coast is a highly-favoured destination for surfers. But for others, the spaciousness, the openness, the freedom, is all we ask – just to walk, to gaze, to be.

SC Skillman

psychological, paranormal and mystery fiction and non-fiction.

My next book ‘Paranormal Warwickshire’ will be published on 15th June 2020 by Amberley Publishing.

Cornwall mini series Part 1: Mawgan Porth beach

This is the first in a series of short reflections on places in north Cornwall.

There will be few words, and mainly images.

To begin, few things could be lovelier than a quiet beach in the muted light of early evening.

You may find Mawgan Porth on the north Cornish coast not far from Newquay. A fish and chip restaurant, an enticing pub, both with peaceful views of the sea: this is a place to calm the soul.

But maybe you’ll just want to wander on the beach, gaze at the sea, and let its serenity fill you.

SC Skillman

psychological, paranormal and mystery fiction and non-fiction.

My next book ‘Paranormal Warwickshire’ will be published on 15th June 2020 by Amberley Publishing.

Penty-Lowarth – Delightful Holiday Cottage for Two Set in Lush Gardens in Cornwall

Set in a central position in Cornwall, close to St Columb Major, you may find Penty-Lowarth, whose name means garden cottage.

Penty-Lowarth holiday cottage at St Columb Major, Cornwall

We have just returned from a very enjoyable stay there and it’s perfectly located for access to many of Cornwall’s major tourist attractions: The Eden Project, St Michael’s Mount, Lost Gardens of Heligan, Tintagel, Port Isaac and Padstow, and many others. The Screech Owl Sanctuary is close by, as is the National Trust property Trerice, and of course for beach-lovers you would be hard put to find lovelier beaches than those at Mawgan Port and Watergate Bay.

The cottage itself is set in lush gardens as you’ll see below.

Gardens surrounding Penty-Lowarth holiday cottage in Cornwall

You may want to wander round to the koi carp pond: the fish are very friendly and will rise out of the water to greet you – with their mouths wide open of course.

Koi carp pond near Penty-Lowarth holiday cottage, Cornwall

Passionate about surfing? Then you’ll find Polzeath’s fabulous surfing beach a twenty minutes drive away. St Austell on the south coast and Newquay on the north coast are both equally accessible.

Penty-Lowarth is beautifully decorated by the present owners, David and Caroline, and something I particularly appreciate in a holiday house or cottage is the thoughtful provision of storage space, with every attention paid to small details. If you follow the link here to the full details of the cottage you will find photos showing you how stylish the interior of the cottage is.

Outside seating rea at Penty-Lowarth holiday cottage, Cornwall

When you arrive you’ll find Cornish coffee, half a dozen eggs, tea, milk, a packet of Cornish fairings and a bottle of wine waiting to welcome you. Full provision is made for dog-owners too, with a dog bed, blankets and bowls all provided.

The cottage is ideal for couples. Do check out Penty-Lowarth if you’re considering a holiday in Cornwall.

SC Skillman, psychological, paranormal and mystery fiction and non-fiction

The Tube Station – Fresh and Imaginative Worship Space above the Surfing Beach at Polzeath, Cornwall

I’ve just visited this creative worship space in Polzeath and was delighted with the vibrant atmosphere and décor.

The Tube Station Polzeath

Working in partnership with the Methodist Church, the Tube Station has a café, an indoor skate ramp, an art gallery, a chill-out space for surfers and all beach-users, a worship venue, and much more.

When I visited one September Sunday morning, the place was packed, with standing room only at the back.

Café Bar in the Tube Station Polzeath

A brilliant speaker, Jude Levermore, who is the Head of Mission for the Methodist Church, gave an engaging talk about “our NHS stories” and how many of us have stories to tell about how the NHS saved us. And so do we have stories to tell about how the grace of God has transformed our lives. An interesting thought: everything the Good Samaritan does for the injured traveller in Jesus’ parable “The Good Samaritan” is now done for us by the NHS – and we expect it too.

Surfboards James and Judas at the Tube Station Polzeath

And her second message was “God wants to use us even though…” then fill in with all your weaknesses and excuses and reasons why you hang back and think you’re not worthy or good enough and don’t believe in yourself. She herself said God wanted to use her as the Head of Mission for the Methodist Church EVEN THOUGH she is a woman, she’s divorced, she isn’t ordained.

I particularly loved the surfboards up on the ceiling, each with a disciple’s name on it. And I noted that Judas Iscariot is there too. Judas is a name that means betrayer to many. And yet I believe Judas was ultimately forgiven and redeemed and saved too. EVEN THOUGH…

I do recommend you experience the Tube Station if you are ever in Polzeath, and especially if you’re there on a Sunday morning.

SC Skillman

psychological, paranormal, mystery fiction & non-fiction

My new book ‘Paranormal Warwickshire’ will be published by Amberley Publishing on 15th June 2020.

Remembering Binna Burra Lodge, Glorious Mountain Eyrie in Queensland, Australia, Destroyed by Fire, September 2019

In South East Queensland, Australia, high in the mountain ranges that rise up behind Surfers Paradise, forming the Gold Coast hinterland, you will reach the small town of Canungra. And there you will find the road to Binna Burra.

Photos taken at Binna Burra, in the Lamington National Park, Gold Coast hinterland, South East Queensland, Australia

At the end of the road is Binna Burra Lodge, set in lush rainforest, high in the glorious mountain ranges of the Lamington National Park. Or at least, you could find it until 7th September 2019 when raging bushfires burned all the cabins and buildings to the ground, felling massive rainforest trees and sending them crashing down across the only road to the site, preventing firefighters from reaching the grounds of the lodge.

Rich with wildlife this rainforest eyrie is a paradise location I visited at least four times during the few years I spent living in Australia 1985-1990, and then visited again when I returned to Australia in 2007 – and was planning to visit again in November 2019. But everyone had to evacuate the site in the face of encroaching fire on Friday 6th September.

The first time I visited Binna Burra on my own, I was delighted with the warm welcome, the conviviality with others who had also come alone, the joyful meals together in the Lodge, the immensely knowledgable tour guide whom I dubbed ‘Peter the Rainforest Host’, the walks through the rainforest, the many magical discoveries and the sublime views.

Binna Burra has special memories for me. Birdsong echoes from peak to peak, the blue haze of eucalyptus vapour often veils the richly forested slopes, and the lure of the Coomera Falls on the 22 kilometre Coomera Circuit awaits keen bushwalkers who love majestic views from rocky outcrops.

I remember feeling as if I was in another dimension up at Binna Burra, the atmosphere so rarefied, the air wine-sweet, a magical presence separate from the world. Here it was I had one of the few mystical experiences of my life.

Another with memories of the Lodge, Cecilia O’Grady, who worked there 1982-1986, said: “I feel quite emotional thinking about it, the history of the place. It’s very spiritual. It’s beautiful.”

The cycle of life in Australia, well known to the aborigines, involves controlled burn-offs. The periodic apparent cataclysm of fire turns the fertile landscape into a devastated waste of blackened stumps, where you would think all life had been eliminated. And yet life returns. The rains come, the green shoots spring up, and the fertile land renews itself.

But for Binna Burra fire is unknown. It is a lush, green, wet environment normally resistant to such fire. “It’s a rainforest, it’s a lush wet green place, how can it be burning?” said Professor Darryl Jones, Griffith University ecologist.

It is impossible to look anywhere else other than climate change for the reasons behind this tragedy. Nevertheless I hope that the rainforest will demonstrate once again its miraculous power for the renewal of life, and I have faith in the restoration of this glorious mountain top eyrie with the construction of a new lodge and accommodation.

I’ve previously written on this blog about Binna Burra: read it here. Also I’ve written about another rainforest lodge in Lamington National Park, OReilly’s, which you may read here.

SC Skillman

psychological, paranormal, mystery

fiction and non-fiction

My next book ‘Paranormal Warwickshire’ will be published by Amberley Publishing in 15th June 2020

Book Review: “The Power of Seven” by Emily Owen

A book of faith and courage, which the author structures around seven biblical themes: Creation, God Is, The Lord is My Shepherd, I Am, Echoes From the Cross, Add to Faith and Revelation Churches. Under each theme, Emily Owen arranges her thoughts and reflections in 7 parts.

In a poetic style which appears deceptively simple at first, the author intersperses autobiographical fragments and anecdotes, with reflection, prayers, and quotes from the Bible in a beguiling conversation with God.

Through this we clearly see the source of the author’s strength through her own challenging life circumstances. Diagnosed with neurofibromatosis at age 16, she then underwent numerous operations which left her deaf at the age of 21. Emily Owen’s gift in using her own personal story is that she reaches beyond her individual situation to reach a place where the reader can identify with what she writes and claim her insights for their own lives.

The author’s tone is gentle and reflective, and ultimately she has created a poignant, beautiful, uplifting book, in a world which stands more than ever in need of the power of contemplative prayer. Authentic and profound, “The Power of Seven” draws you in, showing how painful life experiences can bear a rich harvest of illumination and hope.

SC Skillman

psychological, mystery, paranormal

fiction and non-fiction

Book Review: ‘Less Than Ordinary’ by Nicki Copeland

Less than Ordinary‘, published by Instant Apostle, is a non-fiction inspirational self-help book, an account of one woman’s journey from low self-esteem and negative self-limiting beliefs to a place of wholeness where she is able to blossom, nurture her relationships, rejoice in her own inherent worth, and offer her gifts to the world.

A quote attributed to Nelson Mandela: As we let our own lights shine we unconsciously give others permission to do the same.

During the early part of the book, as I read Nicki’s story, I found myself wondering where all these ideas about herself had come from. What messages was she given when she was a young child? But later I thought that maybe the people who gave her those messages had no idea they were doing something so destructive; perhaps no such intention lay behind their words.

And then I realised I was identifying with some of her experiences, and I recognised the mindset. It may be that cultural presumptions about the role of women have something to do with it – even in our society, male/female equality still has a long way to go – but I also know there are men who feel as Nicki describes in these pages.

On a lighter note, I might mention that PG Wodehouse’s novels are full of young men browbeaten by domineering aunts and other authority figures, who are too shy and timid to express their true feelings, or be assertive. Light or not, the issues Nicki shares with us are not just a female thing.

What interested me in the book was Nicki’s description of how she came out of all this. She says that she ‘gradually began to consider…’ or ‘it occurred to’ her that… or she ‘slowly realised….’

For me the process was the same. Observation of people and experience of life eventually teaches you a stunning truth: that many of those who appear confident are not, underneath; that probably the majority of people shrink from meeting strangers; and that, in fact, when we humans seek to achieve our goals, we seem to be hard-wired to take what Robert McKee describes, in his book Story, ‘the most conservative action first.’

In Story, McKee points out that when constructing a plot, the author sets the main protagonist a challenge to overcome, a goal to achieve. Then the protagonist considers how to get what they want. And they always take the most conservative action first. In other words, they expend the least amount of energy to get what they want. This seems a rule of human nature and in the natural world too.

And if that works, good. But if it doesn’t – then you’ve got to spend a bit more energy, exercise more ingenuity, and do something a bit less conservative. And so on, until only the most extreme measures will do. It’s often only when people are pushed to the limit that they conquer great challenges.

So we can apply this rule of life to what Nicki says in her book Less Than Ordinary. All her early presumptions about herself were utterly false; and when the truth of human nature and behaviour finally broke in on her, she threw those false ideas away and she let her light shine.

I do believe there is great value for us when an author describes this process as well as Nicki does. If you feel this book sounds like one that would speak to you, I’d recommend reading it and pausing every once in a while to think about it, as you go through Nicki’s story.

Courage doesn’t consist of being naturally ‘confident’, and having high self-esteem written into your DNA and grasping challenges eagerly.

Courage is all about those who go on a long journey from out of a dark place, and discover the truth through life experience, then change in the light of it using the new knowledge to transform their lives.

SC Skillman

psychological, mystery, paranormal fiction & non-fiction

Book Review: ‘Reparation’ by Gaby Koppel

I first heard of this book via my local independent bookshop Warwick Books, and planned to go to an evening with Gaby Koppel, to hear her talking about ‘Reparation‘.

The subject of the book – a young Jewish woman’s research into her mother’s past as a survivor of Nazi persecution during World War II – immediately appealed to me, but in the end I wasn’t able to get to that evening. Instead I ordered the book later, and now having read it, how I wish I had been there to see Gaby Koppel and hear her talk about her inspiration for the novel. When you’ve finished reading a novel, that’s when you are hungry to find out details about the author’s personal biography.

This is one of those books which will surely increase your knowledge in a number of areas, not least insights into how Hungary is currently addressing its baleful wartime past, and a vivid description of the fiercely insular life of the Hasidic Jewish community in Stamford Hill, in London; and indeed into how a modern Jewish person with no religious belief feels.

Alongside that, it is a heartfelt and passionate exploration of a mother daughter relationship. And the book helps you to understand wherein Jewish identity lies. It is undoubtedly based on the author’s real life experience of her Hungarian mother and her German father. And the main protagonist, Elizabeth, works in TV production just as Gaby does in real life.

As I began the story, for some time I found the first person narrator’s attitude to her mother Aranca very judgmental and sardonic, expressed in waspish style. Then gradually I began to see how Elizabeth had developed this attitude, and to understand the pressure on her of her mother’s volatile and temperamental behaviour and alcoholic episodes.

As my reading of the novel progressed I liked Elizabeth more and more, with her sharp and sassy wit, and her habit of always saying exactly what she thinks. She is a character who never wears a mask, and I often felt myself identifying with her thoughts and feelings.

As for Aranca herself, known always as Mutti to Elizabeth, she comes over as very challenging and exasperating, but the more we understand what she has suffered in the past, the more we empathise with her. And I was captivated not only by her quest to seek reparation from the Hungarian government for her past losses, but also by Elizabeth’s accounts of her relationships with Dave and with Jon, and by her exploration of how being Jewish profoundly affects every area of life.

I was fascinated by what we learn in the story about the Jews, about their feelings, beliefs and attitudes, and in particular about the Hasidic Jewish community. Reading this book opens up the lives of others to us, and I believe stories like this teach us to respect and accept our differences, and the various ways in which people seek to express their identity.

Highly recommended.

SC Skillman

Psychological, paranormal, mystery

fiction and non-fiction

Author of Mystical Circles, A Passionate Spirit and Perilous Path

My next book Paranormal Warwickshire will be published by Amberley Publishing in June 2020

I’m pleased to announce that I have signed a contract

I’m pleased to announced that I have signed a contract with history publishers Amberley Publishing for a book about Warwickshire to be published in June 2020. This will be a highly illustrated book full of stories arranged under themes from Shakespeare’s ghosts and spirits.

St Mary’s Church Warwick at night. Photo credit: Jamie Robinson.

The book will explore some of the supernatural and spiritual stories in the region. It describes a number of Warwickshire’s most iconic locations which I believe have spiritual resonance and which I’ve visited many times.

These include Guy’s Cliffe House and the Saxon Mill in Warwick; Hall’s Croft and the Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon; Warwick Castle and Kenilworth Castle among other locations.

I’m weaving into this insights from Shakespeare’s ghosts and spirits. And I’ve also been out and about interviewing and listening to people closely associated with the properties who have rich and fascinating stories to tell.

More news on this to follow!

SC Skillman

psychological, paranormal, mystery fiction

Author of Mystical Circles, A Passionate Spirit & Perilous Path

Fun and Book Signing on the Author Stand at the UK Games Expo 2019

At the UK Games Expo 219 a vast array of games creators and players gathered together to celebrate the joy of roleplay and fantasy. Amid an atmosphere buzzing with excitement a team of novelists gathered on the Author Stand selling and signing books in a variety of genres: YA fantasy, historical adventure, time travel, psychological suspense and paranormal thrillers.

The Author Stand at the UK Games Expo 2019 with books by Richard Denning, SC Skillman and Philip S Davies

Alongside the wonderful parade of cosplay characters, we enjoyed the atmosphere and somehow a jolly musketeer and Professor Snape managed to infiltrate our team of authors.

Author Stand at UK Games Expo

Professor Snape certainly managed to attract the book-buyers.

Author in cosplay on Author Stand at the Uk Games Expo 2019
Author in cosplay on Author Stand at the Uk Games Expo 2019

I can recommend the UK Games Expo to you for next year, if you love playing games, and can keep up the hectic pace for three days in the Birmingham NEC.

SC Skillman and assistant Jamie Robinson on the Author Stand at the UK Games Expo 2019
SC Skillman and assistant Jamie Robinson on the Author Stand at the UK Games Expo 2019

SC Skillman

Psychological, paranormal, mystery fiction

Author of Mystical Circles, A Passionate Spirit and Perilous Path

Coming soon: Paranormal Warwickshire