The Wailing Wall, Sacred Space and Topol

A recent 24/7 prayer weekend at church created a “sacred space” in a room, where people could come and reflect, and paint and write and draw, and meditate in a tent or tie a leaf to a tree or write their angst on a paper chain then break the chain and tear it to pieces and throw it away. But what struck me most was “The Wailing Wall”. Here people could post their anger and doubts and frustrations to God.

And what I discovered was the amount of anguish going on below the surface. “My yoke is easy and my burden is light,” said Jesus. If you’re a music lover you may have heard of these words in Handel’s Messiah. What Jesus says is: Let go of all your worries and anxieties and lay them on me. And in this lies the value of the Wailing Wall (as used in our 24/7 prayer weekend).

The Wailing Wall in Jerusalem  – the tradition of pouring out anguish to God – from the Lamentations of Jeremiah through to Topol in The Fiddler on the Roof is a powerful tradition.

 Come to me… Keep company with me and you’ll learn to live freely and lightly is how Eugene Petersen expresses Jesus’ words in his wonderful paraphrase of the Bible in streetwise language, The Message. Come unto me all ye who are burdened and heavy laden and I will give you rest.