The Museum of London, Docklands: a Beguiling Talk About the Social History of the English Pub

The English pub is such a well-loved institution.

Sailortown gallery, Museum of London Docklands
Sailortown gallery, Museum of London Docklands

I know when I lived in Australia for four years, this wonderful institution was much prized for its almost legendary status amongst the Australians, even if they did think we British are a bit weird to go around drinking warm beer all the time.

And at the Museum of London, Docklands, I had the chance to listen to a talk on the social history of this, the most iconic “hostelry”.museum of london docklands

Crowded into The Three Mariners, a replica of a small historical pub within the Museum’s Sailortown recreation, we listened to a most engaging talk on the subject. I learned that the social history of drinking in Britain began when the Romans introduced the taverna to the natives of these isles, and thus began the habit of drinking wine.

Then, later on, after the Romans had given up on us and left, the Vikings invaded – and introduced beer. then we British became used to the alehouses. Ale was a natural choice for England, and later inns began to appear.

During Tudor times, Henry VIII introduced licensing laws.. He wanted the “public house” regulated and ordered.

Then on into the 1600s and 1700s – and gin was the thing. It was very cheap and easy to make; and we know of course from  vivid engravings and from our social history, the effect that the craze for gin had on our society.

And onto William Gladstone – when he was Prime Minister he decided it would be morally superior for us to revert to wine drinking. Prior to his time wine had only been available in kegs. Now he introduced the bottle of wine, and promoted the idea that there was some kind of social refinement or even moral virtue about drinking wine as opposed to beer.

And now of course we have inherited these social  presumptions about our drinking habits. Who, our guide asked, would dare request a strawberry daiquiri when he’s sitting amongst his mates in the pub and they’ve all ordered beer? Social meltdown, at the very least!

It all brought me back to the first time I tasted alcohol. My first love was Asti Spumante; and Blue Nun was the order of the day too, along with Mateus Rose. And when I was at university, I remember such combinations as Guinness and Grapefruit, Dry Martini and Lemonade, and American Dry and Whisky – along with the much-favoured Snowball (Advocaat and Lemonade). And I have long loved a gin and tonic…

But how amusing it is to think how easily we attribute a social value to anything we might do… and no wonder the drinking of alcohol has not escaped this natural tendency of human nature.

But it was great fun to listen to our enthusiastic and lively speaker setting all our ideas about alcohol firmly in the context of English social history.

 

 

Author: SC Skillman

I'm a writer of psychological, paranormal and mystery fiction and non-fiction. My next book, 'Paranormal Warwickshire', will be published by Amberley Publishing in June 2020. Find all my published books here: https://amzn.to/2UktQ6x

2 thoughts on “The Museum of London, Docklands: a Beguiling Talk About the Social History of the English Pub

  1. Oh this sounds very interesting! My introduction to social drinking began with brightly coloured alcopops – Hooch, blue WKD and Black Metz back in the day! Now I am much more refined and prefer a London Dry Gin & Tonic (with appropriate garnish) 😉

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    1. I’ve never tasted the 3 drinks you mention but your tastes these days coincide with mine – a nice G & T probably ranks equal in my favour with a glass of Chardonnay or Pinot Grigio! I had an interesting discussion on Twitter recently with someone who bemoaned how difficult it was to get barpeople to understand a request for “a white wine spritzer”. I now think the best way to ask for it is by asking for a glass of white wine plus a bottle of soda water!

      Liked by 1 person

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