Australia and New Zealand Mini Series Part 16: Queensland Maritime Museum, Brisbane

This is the sixteenth in my series of short reflections on different places in Australia and New Zealand, which I visited in November 2019.

Map of Australia and New Zealand

In my last post I wrote about the Brisbane City Botanic Gardens which may be found inside a big loop of the Brisbane River, opposite the Kangaroo Point cliffs on the south bank.

Having walked through the City Botanic Gardens, you will reach the Brisbane riverstage. There you will find the Goodwill Bridge, a footbridge which spans the Brisbane River, and takes you directly to the Queensland Maritime Museum on the south bank.

view of the dry dock where the Diamantina is displayed at the Queensland Maritime Museum, Brisbane

This is a fascinating museum run mostly by volunteers, where you may find not only a gallery full of intriguing maritime history and objects, but also a World War 2 ship, The Diamantina, outside in the dry dock, together with Brisbane’s favourite tug, the Forceful.

The Diamantina is a Royal Australian Navy frigate built in Queensland and commissioned in 1945 and one of the last remaining World War II river class frigates in the world.

The Diamantina at the Queensland Maritime Museum, Brisbane

I love exploring historical ships like this and it was fascinating to go round all the rooms below decks and to imagine what life was like for the crew when the ship saw service during the 2nd World War.

The quarterdeck of the Diamantina, Queensland Maritime Museum Brisbane

Also on display is The Forceful, Brisbane’s favourite tug.

Information sign on the quarterdeck of the Diamantina at the Queensland Maritime Museum, Brisbane
View of The Forceful and the Brisbane river, taken from the Queensland Maritime Museum
Information sign about The Forceful, at the Queensland Maritime Museum, Brisbane

The Forceful’s propeller, on display at the Queensland Maritime Museum, Brisbane
view of the Brisbane river from the Stokehouse bar and restaurant

Afterwards we strolled a short way along the south bank to one of Brisbane’s newest restaurant and bars, The Stokehouse, where we enjoyed an apple cider, seated on bar stools overlooking the river.

Here you may explore fascinating exhibitions on such themes as “Antarctica: Endurance and Survival” and “The Land of Dreams… Over the Seas to Queensland.”

Allow at least two or more hours to do justice to all the exhibits and to enable you to explore the ships.

SC Skillman, psychological, suspense, paranormal fiction & non-fiction. My next book, Paranormal Warwickshire, will be published by Amberley Publishing on 15th June 2020 and is available to pre-order now either online, or from the publisher’s website, or from your local bookshop.

Australia and New Zealand Mini Series Part 15: Brisbane City Botanic Gardens

This is the fifteenth in my series of short reflections on different places in Australia and New Zealand, which I visited in November 2019.

Map of Australia and New Zealand

In my last post I wrote about the Dorrigo Rainforest Centre in New South Wales with panoramic views over the pristine rainforest, a glimpse into Gondwana, the remnant of the vast continent which existed before Australia broke off from Antarctica and began to drift north.

City Lookout, Brisbane City Botanic Gardens

After our tour of the New South Wales coastal region, we returned once again to Queensland, and its capital city of Brisbane. Even here, in the midst of a major metropolis, we may find many ways to respect and honour, co-operate and harmonise with the natural world.

Banyan Fig Tree in Brisbane City Botanic Gardens

Today I share some images of the wonderful Brisbane City Botanic Gardens. You may find these gardens inside a big loop of the Brisbane River, opposite the Kangaroo Point cliffs on the south bank.

As the ancient rainforests are our magnificent heritage on this planet, I have been particularly struck by the imagination, expertise, dedication and hard work of landscape architects who within the city environment have recreated lush rainforest areas.

In the gardens you will find the Gardens Club Cafe, which is within the restored Curators Cottage. I can recommend this lovely cafe, situated close to the Rainforest Area, and a perfect place for lunch as you take a break from your stroll around the botanic gardens.

Lunch in the Gardens Club Cafe, Brisbane City Botanic Gardens

You may also walk along the riverside path and enjoy the views of the Brisbane river and the many boats, beyond which rises the city skyline of the south bank.

riverside view from the Brisbane City Botanic Gardens

I also love walking through mangrove swamps.

a walk beside the mangroves at the edge of the river, Brisbane City Botanic Gardens

I was fascinated, too, to learn from an interpretative sign along the walk how vital mangroves are to our ecology: and in particular, their potential to offset some of the negative effects of climate change.

Interpretative sign about ecological significance of mangroves, mangrove river walk, Brisbane City Botanic Gardens

In particular, mangroves are an important wetland type, and perform many functions such as:

protecting – acting as a buffer zone between land and tidal waters, storm surges and wind;

providing – habitat and nursery areas for fish, crabs, prawns and birds;

purification of water – a settling area for nutrients and sediments;

Mangroves are now better recognised for their economic value and potential for climate change mitigation through coastal protection and carbon sequestration and offsetting.

storing – mangrove ecosystems are among the most efficient carbon sinks on earth, storing carbon at a rate six times more than that of an undisturbed Amazon forest.

walking beside the mangroves along the riverside path in Brisbane City Botanic Gardens

I find these facts amazing, moving and inspiring. I love walking among mangrove swamps because of their lush, cool, shady, mysterious atmosphere; but now I know of their immense value for the survival of our planet, I am even more in awe of them.

So when we visit places of renewal and restoration in the natural world, we find that our own relationship with “the green and the blue” encapsulates so much more than simply “a good feeling.”

This heals and uplifts us on an emotional and psychological level; and then we find that the discoveries of science accord with our own inner experience.

Our planet, our mental health, our survival as a species depends upon so many delicate, interconnecting threads: and among these, the precious resources of the natural world: mangroves and rainforests and so much more.

SC Skillman, psychological, suspense, paranormal fiction & non-fiction. My next book, Paranormal Warwickshire, will be published by Amberley Publishing on 15th June 2020 and is available to pre-order now either online, or from the publisher’s website, or from your local bookshop.