Cornwall Mini Series part 11: Falmouth Discovery Quay and Pendennis Castle

In this post, I take up again my Cornwall mini series which I started on 8th October 2019. I opened the series with the beach at Mawgan Porth and continued with a series of short reflections on different places easily reached from St Columb Major.

In early July 2020, we visited Cornwall again, during the first week after the UK’s Covid-19 lockdown had been relaxed. Once more we stayed in the delightful holiday cottage of Penty-Lowarth, in Quoit, near St Columb Major.

We visited a few different locations this time and I’ll be writing about them and sharing photos in my next few posts.

Today we visit Falmouth and Discovery Quay.

A curious atmosphere surrounds a visit to a place like Discovery Quay which is intended to host thousands of people during “normal” times.

We loved wandering through Discovery Quay even though it seemed suspended in a dreamlike quality of stillness.

Of course, the magnificent Maritime Museum had not yet re-opened after the Covid-19 lockdown. Very few people had begun to venture out yet, and we traversed the open space designed for large crowds, and for mass public entertainments, with a curious feeling of being in a time-loop.

I love this quote from the great novelist Joseph Conrad which I read on an informative noticeboard on the Quay:

The sea has never been friendly to man. At most it has been the accomplice of human restlessness.

There was a special quality to this experience, wandering through the quay, gazing at the boats, coming upon captivating views every few steps. Some of the many restaurants had begun to re-open and we enjoyed a relaxing lunch in The Shack, where the social distancing changes had been well organised, despite the fact that there were very few people to socially distance from.

Having visited Discovery Quay we then went on to visit Pendennis Castle.

Originally built by Henry VIII this has a fascinating history as it returned into use during Elizabethan times ad the Napoleonic Wars and World Wars I and II. Situated across the bay is the twin castle of St Mawes. The views from Pendennis Point are spectacular.

Again, few visitors were in evidence, though the social distancing arrangements were well in place.

We toured the Keep and the Half Moon battery alongside a small party of other visitors, and both tours were excellent, captivating and informative.

Check out the previous posts in my Cornwall mini series.

Part 1 Mawgan Porth

Part 2 Watergate Bay

Part 3 The Eden Project

Part 4 The Lost Gardens of Heligan

Part 5 Port Isaac

Part 6 Truro

Part 7 Trerice

Part 8 The Screech Owl Sanctuary

Part 9 St Michael’s Mount

Part 10 Tintagel

Oxfordshire Place of Inspiration: Castle Inn, Edgehill

A place of inspiration is any place which arouses strong emotions, or perhaps memories, dreams, or reflections. The Castle Inn at Edgehill Oxfordshire is one such place.Castle Inn Edge Hill image 1

A tavern was first built in this high location in 1742 – one hundred years after the date of the Battle of Edgehill which took place in the valley below. There, on  23rd October 1642 the forces of the Parliamentarians and the Royalists faced each other in the open field between Kineton and Radway. The English Civil War was just beginning. The King’s forces had been on their way to London via Birmingham and Kenilworth. The Parliamentarian forces had been heading for Worcester. And they accidentally came together in this bloody battle. The Civil War should have ended there. But it didn’t. The battle ended indecisively, but if the royalist forces had marched straight to London they would have gained the advantage, and the war would have been over.

Instead, they made one of those fateful wrong decisions upon which English history so often turns. The Parliamentarian forces got to London first, and a cruel war ensured. King Charles I had lost his best chance to win. His own personal story ended when he paid the highest price for his errors and bad choices, by being beheaded.

Castle Inn Edge Hill image 2.jpgOne of England’s most evocative and compelling ghost stories lingers around this place too. Since the time of the battle, haunting sounds and apparitions have been reported by many, at night, and particularly around the anniversary of the battle.

Above all this, the Castle Inn sits with its folly in the form of a castellated tower (in which you may book an overnight stay), a picturesque and intriguing attraction at Edgehill, offering refreshment, delicious meals and excellent service in its delightful beer garden, refurbished dining room and historic bar.

It’s one of my favourite pubs to visit, here in the heart of England. Though its attendant history is very sad – see the exhibition now on display at St Peter’s Church Radway – being a story full of tragedy and cruelty and fate, of the kind we love to reflect upon from our safe distance of centuries: until we start to compare it with several current situations of conflict in the world today.

 

 

Such, to me, qualifies it to be a place of spiritual resonance, because it affords us an opportunity to reflect upon our own lives, and upon the human story and its twists and turns of fate, from our perspective of centuries after the original historical events. When a place evokes strong feelings of pity, poignancy, compassion, to my mind, that makes it a special place.
The Castle Inn EdgehillAnd by the way the interior is delightful, the views are magnificent, the service excellent and the menu thoroughly enjoyable!