Paranormal Warwickshire Extracts Part 4: St Mary’s Church Warwick

This is the fourth in a series of ten posts which will take us up to the date of publication of my new book Paranormal Warwickshire, out from Amberley Publishing on 15th November. This richly illustrated compilation of strange tales from Shakespeare’s county can be pre-ordered now from all online bookstores, and from Warwick Books and Kenilworth Books.

Gothic Tower of St Mary’s Warwick at night. Photo credit Jamie Robinson

The gothic tower of St Mary’s Church Warwick is the defining feature of the town of Warwick, which can be viewed from miles away, especially by those approaching from the direction of Stratford-upon-Avon along the A429. I can imagine that in past centuries travellers would have reached the top of the hill and said, “Ah! here’s Warwick!”

From the top of the church tower you may obtain an excellent view down onto Guy’s Tower in Warwick Castle; and likewise, from Guy’s Tower, one of the very best views of St Mary’s Warwick may be obtained.

St Mary’s Church, Warwick, as seen from the top of Guy’s Tower, Warwick Castle. Photo credit Abigail Robinson.

At St Mary’s you may find one of the greatest medieval treasures in the UK, retaining the glorious craftsmanshp of pre-Reformation England: the magnificent, richly ornamented Beauchamp Chapel.

The Beauchamp Chapel, St Mary’s Church Warwick. Photo credit Jamie Robinson

The Chapel contains several tombs of the Earls of Warwick and other famous historical individuals, such as Sir Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, and his wife Lettice, and their infant son who tragically died young, and was known affectionately as the Noble Impe.

Here is an extract from my book Paranormal Warwickshire.

The Beauchamp Chapel was consecrated in 1475.

   Within it you may find the tomb of Ambrose Dudley (earl from 1561 to 1590), who was granted Warwick Castle by Elizabeth I and whose brother Guilford married Lady Jane Grey. Also entombed in the Chapel is Sir Robert Dudley, [image] Queen Elizabeth I’s favourite, who died in 1588 and here lies alongside his second wife, Lettice Knollys; and also the tomb of their son, the Noble Impe, (image) who died in infancy in 1584.

   Of particular note, too, are the long scrolls of plainsong music carried by angels, while the feathered figures of other angels play musical instruments of the period. They may be seen high in the tracery of the side windows, and on occasions St Mary’s hosts concerts by musicians such as the York Waits, who play replicas of the very medieval instruments – shawms, rebecs and sackbuts among others – played by the angels.

   On a number of occasions visitors report the sound of a ghost choir singing psalms in the chapel when there’s nobody there.

   If you stand in the nave and looks toward the chancel and altar, you may admire the vaulting of flying ribs, one of the finest examples on this scale in England. There are many memorials in this part of the church, and underneath it is a vault which was commonly called the bone-house or charnel house.

   A mysterious dark figure is often seen at the altar in the evenings when the verger comes to close the church. When the verger moves down the aisle to ask him to leave, the figure disappears into the choir stalls and doesn’t reappear. A search of the choir stalls shows them to be empty. So far no research has uncovered the history behind this figure.

from Paranormal Warwickshire by SC Skillman

Find out more by preordering Paranormal Warwickshire here.

Paranormal Warwickshire Extracts: Part 3 The Thomas Oken Tea Rooms, Warwick.

This is the third in a series of ten posts which will take us up to the date of publication of my new book Paranormal Warwickshire, out from Amberley Publishing on 15th November. This richly illustrated compilation of strange tales from Shakespeare’s county can be pre-ordered now from all online bookstores, and from Warwick Books and Kenilworth Books.

Thomas Oken’s House is one of Warwick’s most enchanting Tudor buildings. It was built by and is associated with a benevolent gentleman, one of those wealthy Elizabethan merchants who stewarded his money wisely, made a hugely generous bequest to his town, and whose gift is still doing good five hundred years later for the local people.

Numerous curious tales are told of Thomas Oken’s House; and many of them from those who either work in or enjoy a meal in the tea rooms.

Afternoon Tea in The Thomas Oken Tea Rooms, Warwick (photo credit Sheila Robinson)

Here’s an extract from my book Paranormal Warwickshire.

   As soon as Jo took over the tea rooms in November 2011, she started to hear tales of odd goings-on from her young staff. But first, let us backtrack to Jo’s curious conversation with the previous owner of the business.

   “He said to me, ‘You won’t want to hang around too long on your own after closing time, I can tell you.’”  Curious, Jo nevertheless took a sceptical view of this. The vendor added that he had seen door latches shaking up and down on their own. But since Jo took over, she has felt nothing but a friendly presence there. “Thomas Oken was a wonderful man,” she says. The affection with which she speaks of him is testament to the enduring reputation of this good-hearted and far-sighted Elizabethan merchant.

   Jo continues, “I have a lot of young staff who seem to experience strange things in the house much more than I do. I believe that younger people are more spirit-sensitive. Several customers have reported seeing a dignified gentleman with fine clothes and a stick who saunters into the room going from table to table and smiling benevolently at the customers there. One visitor told me that she was sitting in the big upper room and the chatter faded away, whereupon she heard the sounds of a medieval street market: carts and horses, vendors shouting their wares.

from Paranormal Warwickshire by SC Skillman
The menu in the Thomas Oken Tea Rooms, Warwick. Photo credit: Sheila Robinson

To find out more preorder Paranormal Warwickshire here.

And if you like listening to podcasts, you can listen to me here, talking to radio presenter Tony Lloyd about my books on Tony Lloyd’s podcast Human Stories.

Paranormal Warwickshire Extracts Part 2: The Saxon Mill and Gaveston’s Cross, Warwick

This is the second in a series of ten posts which will take us up to the date of publication of my new book Paranormal Warwickshire, out from Amberley Publishing on 15th November. This richly illustrated compilation of strange tales from Shakespeare’s county can be pre-ordered now from all online bookstores, and from Warwick Books and Kenilworth Books.

The Saxon Mill, viewed from the Coventry road, Warwick. Photo credit Abigail Robinson.

Today we visit the Saxon Mill,now a well-loved pub, bar and restaurant, and formerly the mill belonging to the Guy’s Cliffe estate. And after we have explored and enjoyed all that the Saxon Mill has to offer, at this scenic and atmospheric location on the river Avon, we will then head across the road and further up towards Leek Wootton, to wonder at the curious monument of Gaveston’s Cross.

Gaveston’s Cross. Photo by permission of Warwickshire Libraries.

Here’s an extract:

The original mill belonged to the Augustinian St Mary’s Abbey in Kenilworth. The abbey owned the mill until the dissolution of the monasteries between 1536 and 1541. It then formed part of the Guy’s Cliffe Estate, and remained so up until the Second World War during which time it was known as The Old Mill.

    In 1813, Bertie Greatheed added the picturesque balcony, which forms the scene for a present-day paranormal tale.

   James, a former member of staff, takes up the story.

  “I was employed as a grill chef at the pub when Harvester owned it. One hot summer night, whilst working on the grill in the front of house, I went to open the side door and let some air through. Out of the corner of my eye I saw a white figure pass along the balcony beyond the small window. Thinking someone had come up the outside stairs, I waited for them to come through the door. No one came through. I looked out through the window to see who it was, but saw no one there. About ten to fifteen minutes later I saw another figure moving towards the door again. I poked my head out once more and still saw nothing. I told my colleagues, who said, ‘that’s Monty, the pub’s ghost. He often knocks things over, slams doors and such. He’s quite entertaining!’”

   Rebuilding work was carried out on the Mill in 1822 and it was a working mill until 1938. It was converted to a restaurant and bar in 1952.  The water-wheel, now restored, is visible to all who pass by; the mill-race can be seen through a glass panel in the floor of the pub.

   On the other side of the Avon, you may take the riverside path for a good view of  Guy’s Cliffe across the water.

   Nearby, Blacklow Hill became the scene of a notorious summary execution on 1 July 1312.  Guy de Beauchamp, earl of Warwick, had lured Piers Gaveston, King Edward II’s favourite, to Warwick Castle. Guy had long wanted to get rid of Piers, who had insulted him personally, and was exerting far too much influence over the king. Also he had flouted commands to leave England and stay out, if he valued his life.  The earl’s men dragged Piers in a cart to Blacklow Hill, where they ran him through with a sword and beheaded him. The place of his execution is now occupied by Gaveston’s Cross. [image]

   It was Bertie Greatheed himself who caused the monument to be erected on his land. Today the land is in different private ownership, and not open to the public. However, by special permission it is possible to visit Gaveston’s Cross, in the heart of the woods.

   The area where the monument stands is, according to several accounts, a centre of paranormal activity. James remembers an incident from his early teens. “Some friends and I walked up into the woods opposite the Saxon Mill to try and find Gaveston’s Cross. Being a bright summer’s day I thought nothing of the potential fear factor. We hadn’t got further than a few feet into the wood when day turned into the pitch black of night, with a cold clammy feeling to boot. Needless to say we didn’t hang around long and burst back into bright sunshine feeling rather relieved and more than a bit shaky.”

Paranormal Warwickshire by SC Skillman, pub Amberley 15 Nov 2020
Inscription on Gaveston’s Cross. Photo by permission of Warwickshire Libraries.

To find out more about the history and the curious tales surrounding these and many other locations in Shakespeare’s county, do order your copy of Paranormal Warwickshire here.

Paranormal Warwickshire Extracts Part 1: Guy’s Cliffe, Warwick

This is the first in a series of ten posts which will take us up to the date of publication of my new book Paranormal Warwickshire, out from Amberley Publishing on 15th November. This richly illustrated compilation of strange tales from Shakespeare’s county can be pre-ordered now from all online bookstores, and from Warwick Books and Kenilworth Books.

Guy’s Cliffe, Warwick. Photo credit Abigail Robinson.

Today let me take you to Guy’s Cliffe, Warwick. This poignant and atmospheric ruined mansion is the first place local people think of when I speak to them about my book. “Have you included Guy’s Cliffe?” they ask. I reply, “Yes – the first chapter is devoted to it. I took a tour with the custodian Adrian King and have recorded many of his stories.”

Main entrance to courtyard, Guy’s Cliffe, Warwick. Photo credit Jamie Robinson.

Here’s an extract.

Guy’s Cliffe, Warwick

Leave not the mansion so long tenantless

Lest, growing ruinous, the building fall

And leave no memory of what it was!

Two Gentlemen of Verona, Act 5, Scene 4

   What could be more poignant than a great house, surmounting a cliff, abandoned and desolate? Clinging to a cliff alongside the river Avon north of Warwick, you may find the ruins of just such a mansion.

   Many stories linger within these imposing ruins and their environs. As you wander around you may wish to climb those gaping staircases, or gaze at the view down the Avon, beyond the Saxon Mill to Milverton Hill from those stone balconies; or imagine you see a shadowy figure flit past that empty window-frame.

   Adrian King, the present Custodian of Guy’s Cliffe, told me: “Years ago, my father told me a story, which first drew me to this estate. He said that whilst standing on the bridge further down the river at the Saxon Mill, looking toward Guy’s Cliffe, he noticed a woman standing on one of those high balconies. He said ‘she had a green aura around her’. Then to his horror she threw herself off the balcony down onto the ground.”

   This story piqued Adrian’s interest and he began to research the history of Guy’s Cliffe. Years later he took up an appointment as custodian there.

   The known story of the estate spans ten centuries. Well before any structures existed here, Christian hermits were attracted to the caves by the mystical qualities of this location. 16th century historians described the area as an idyllic glade with many clear springs above a steep rock full of caves….washed at the bottom by a crystal river.

   Even before those hermits, it is probable that ancient Celtic people would have come here.

   “Water has a strong influence on this place,” says Adrian.  “The attraction would have been not only rock – a wooded area with caverns in it – but springs as well. Those two aspects alone, rock and water, are spiritual; they would lend a reverence to the place. Very early on, a spring would have been attributed to a deity. The Romans came along and they melded their gods with the local deities, and so forth.”

   Adrian feels sure that people from the very distant past knew where to find centres of energy, or sites that you would consider sacred.

   “They seemed to home in on them.”

    He believes that the stone or rock here, and the water, work together rather like a battery. The stone tape theory proposes that stone possesses a certain unique property whereby human events and emotions are imprinted upon it and will later replay.

Paranormal Warwickshire by SC Skillman, pub. Amberley, 15 Nov 2020
Guy’s Cliffe as it appeared in 1900. Photo credit Warwickshire County Record Office.

Adrian goes on to share many of the curious anecdotes associated with Guy’s Cliffe, and the strange events visitors continue to experience, right up to the present day.

Statue of Guy of Warwick, in the Chapel of St Mary Magdalene, Guy’s Cliffe. By permission of Warwickshire Libraries.

To find out more about the history of this fascinating place, and about the many strange stories that cling to the house and estate, preorder Paranormal Warwickshire here.

Paranormal Warwickshire Part 17: Coughton Court, Alcester

This is the seventeenth in a series of glimpses into my new book Paranormal Warwickshire which will be published by Amberley Publishing on 15th November 2020.

Coughton Court Alcester Warwickshire
First view of the house at Coughton Court, Warwickshire (photo credit Jamie Robinson)

The Tudor house at Coughton Court, for centuries the family seat of the Throckmorton family, is one of the loveliest National Trust properties in Warwickshire and it has a variety of gardens, both formal and natural, including an enchanting bog garden.

view gazebo bog garden Coughton Court Warwickshire
A view along the path to the gazebo in the bog garden at Coughton Court Warwickshire

The grounds slope down towards the banks of the River Arrow.

river Arrow at Coughton Court Warwickshire
The River Arrow at Coughton Court Warwickshire
garden Coughton Court Warwickshire
A view of the garden at Coughton Court (National Trust), Alcester, Warwickshire

The grounds are particularly notable for a stunning walled RHS garden which was designed by two members of the Throckmorton family, Clare and her daughter Christine, professional garden designers.

Nearby are two churches: the nearest, St Peter, is Anglican and was built in the late 15th century by Sir Robert Throckmorton. It began life as a Catholic church but after the reformation became Church of England.

The paranormal tale which I recount in my book Paranormal Warwickshire is connected to the graveyard of the Anglican church.

Anglican church of St Peter and graveyard at Coughton Court Warwickshire
The Anglican Church of St Peter at Coughton Court, Alcester, Warwickshire

Beyond that the Catholic Church of St Peter, St Paul and St Elizabeth was built in 1855, when the family could at last worship openly as Catholics. The family have remained true to their Catholic faith for many generations, and in the sixteenth century they found their way around Elizabeth I’s religious laws, as so many Catholic recusants did in those dangerous and turbulent times.

Catholic Church Coughton Court Warwickshire
The Catholic Church at Coughton Court National Trust, Alcester, Warwickshire

Another curious anecdote relates to the coat of arms which formerly hung over the front entrance. To find out more, do preorder Paranormal Warwickshire here.

View towards Front entrance Coughton Court Warwickshire
View towards Front entrance Coughton Court Warwickshire

The Throckmorton name is of course linked to the Gunpowder Plot and a fascinating exhibition in the house tells the full story.

view gazebo bog garden Coughton Court Warwickshire
A view along the path to the gazebo in the bog garden at Coughton Court Warwickshire

Discover more about the intriguing history, the curious anecdotes, and the many poignant associations with the most dramatic periods of English history at Coughton Court in my book Paranormal Warwickshire.

Do check out my other posts in this series, which I began on 14th August 2020 with Shakespeare’s Ghosts and Spirits, and which brings us up to the publication date of my book Paranormal Warwickshire – 15th November 2020.

Warwick Castle

Guy’s Cliffe, Warwick

Gaveston’s Cross and the Saxon Mill, Warwick

St Mary’s Warwick

Kenilworth Castle

Abbey Fields, Kenilworth

Leamington Spa

Baddesley Clinton

Stoneleigh Abbey

Thomas Oken’s House and Lord Leycester Hospital, Warwick

Rugby locations

Nuneaton locations

Ettington Park

Glimpses of Paranormal Warwickshire Part 16: Holy Trinity Church, Stratford-upon-Avon

This is the sixteenth in a series of glimpses into my new book Paranormal Warwickshire which will be published by Amberley Publishing on 15th November 2020.

Holy Trinity Church, Stratford-upon-Avon is known as Shakespeare’s Church, because the Bard was baptised there, and because he is buried there. The story of his association with this church, and the presence of several clues that he may have drawn direct inspiration from the church and its graveyard for his literary works, makes this church a place of pilgrimage for those who love Shakespeare.

Holy Trinity Church Stratford upon Avon
Holy Trinity Church Stratford-upon-Avon (photo credit Jamie Robinson)

The church is located beside the River Avon beyond the Royal Shakespeare Theatre, and it has strong spiritual resonance, for many reasons beside the fact that it is a place of worship, and has been a centre of holiness for centuries.

William Shakespeare Engraving First Folio 1623 by Martin Droeshout
William Shakespeare Engraving First Folio 1623 by Martin Droeshout

Speculating about Shakespeare’s own faith, and his position on matters of religion, has long been a fruitful area of debate and enquiry among Shakespeare scholars, and it is fascinating to hunt for evidence of his own beliefs within his works – and to draw our own conclusions from this.

Shakespeare monument Holy Trinity Church Stratford upon Avon
Shakespeare’s monument above his grave in Holy Trinity Church Stratford-upon-Avon (photo credit Jamie Robinson)

Since he lived in times of great religious turbulence, it has been speculated that his own father had true Catholic sympathies (despite the fact that at the reformation, he was forced to whitewash over the medieval splendour on the walls of the Guild Chapel). It is known, too, that during Shakespeare’s period of schooling, the young boy destined for literary greatness would have come under the influence of a schoolmaster who was a strong Catholic.

Shakespeare's grave Holy Trinity Church Stratford upon Avon
Shakespeare’s grave in Holy Trinity Church Stratford-upon-Avon (photo credit Jamie Robinson)

As in matters of politics, so in matters of religion – and since they were inextricably bound up with one another, Shakespeare would have needed to tread a delicate tightrope as he wrote his plays. What he wrote cannot be seen in isolation from the pressures that would have been placed upon him by Elizabeth I and James I. And yet his originality of thought, his humanity and profound insight into human nature shone through all this.

Clopton Chapel Holy Trinity Church Stratford upon Avon
Clopton Chapel, Holy Trinity Church, Stratford-upon-Avon (photo credit Jamie Robinson). One of the paranormal tales told of this church concerns a young girl who was a member of the Clopton family.

One of the most often-told tales of this church concerns the inscription upon Shakespeare’s grave.

Inscription on Shakespeare's grave Holy Trinity Church Stratford upon Avon
Inscription upon Shakespeare’s grave in Holy Trinity Church Stratford-upon-Avon forbidding anyone to disturb his bones – so far the warning has been honoured, despite applications for permission to investigate his grave to find manuscripts which are rumoured to be buried with the Bard

Discover more about the intriguing history, the curious anecdotes, and the many poignant associations with Shakespeare at Holy Trinity Church Stratford-upon-Avon in my book Paranormal Warwickshire.

Do check out my other posts in this series, which I began on 14th August 2020 with Shakespeare’s Ghosts and Spirits, and which brings us up to the publication date of my book Paranormal Warwickshire – 15th November 2020.

Warwick Castle

Guy’s Cliffe, Warwick

Gaveston’s Cross and the Saxon Mill, Warwick

St Mary’s Warwick

Kenilworth Castle

Abbey Fields, Kenilworth

Leamington Spa

Baddesley Clinton

Stoneleigh Abbey

Thomas Oken’s House and Lord Leycester Hospital, Warwick

Rugby locations

Nuneaton locations

Ettington Park

Coughton Court, Alcester

Glimpses of Paranormal Warwickshire Part 15: the Royal Shakespeare Theatre, Stratford-upon-Avon

This is the fifteenth in a series of glimpses into my new book Paranormal Warwickshire which will be published by Amberley Publishing on 15th November 2020.

Royal Shakespeare Theatre by River Avon Stratford upon Avon
A view of the Royal Shakespeare Theatre from the opposite bank of the River Avon at Stratford-upon-Avon (photo credit Jamie Robinson)

The Royal Shakespeare Theatre stands on the banks of the River Avon on a site formerly occupied by Shakespeare’s own garden, in the final decades of his life. He bought the house at New Place with his London money, and there he lived to the end of his life, bequeathing the house on to his daughter Susanna and her husband Dr John Hall. It is thought he wrote The Tempest there.

The land upon which the house once stood was probably occupied by a smallholding rather than a pleasure garden. Nevertheless it is very appropriate that the theatre, (known in its earliest incarnation 1879-1926, as the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre) should be located here.

Royal  Shakespeare Theatre and Bancroft Gardens Stratford upon Avon
Royal Shakespeare Theatre and the Bancroft Gardens Stratford upon Avon (photo credit Jamie Robinson)

Beloved by generations of great actors and devoted audiences, the theatre gives rise to many haunting tales. Strange events have been experienced by front-of-house staff, audience members, actors, other members of staff, and even construction workers on the scaffolding above the stripped-out skeleton of the upper circle, during the time of renovation for The Transformation Project completed in November 2010.

Royal Shakespeare Theatre from Clopton Bridge Stratford upon Avon
A view of the Royal Shakespeare Theatre from the Clopton Bridge Stratford-upon-Avon (photo credit Jamie Robinson)

Discover more about the intriguing history and the strange events at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre in my book Paranormal Warwickshire.

Do check out my other posts in this series, which I began on 14th August 2020 with Shakespeare’s Ghosts and Spirits, and which brings us up to the publication date of my book Paranormal Warwickshire – 15th November 2020.

Warwick Castle

Guy’s Cliffe, Warwick

Gaveston’s Cross and the Saxon Mill, Warwick

St Mary’s Warwick

Kenilworth Castle

Abbey Fields, Kenilworth

Leamington Spa

Baddesley Clinton

Stoneleigh Abbey

Thomas Oken’s House and Lord Leycester Hospital, Warwick

Rugby locations

Nuneaton locations

Ettington Park

The other posts in the series will cover the following locations:

Holy Trinity, Stratford-upon-Avon

Coughton Court, Alcester

Glimpses of Paranormal Warwickshire Part 14: Ettington Park

This is the fourteenth in a series of glimpses into my new book Paranormal Warwickshire which will be published by Amberley Publishing on 15th November 2020.

Ettington Park, Warwickshire
Ettington Park Warwickshire, which staands in extensive grounds beside the river Stour.

Ettington Park is a gothic mansion outside Stratford-upon-Avon, now a luxury hotel. It stands in extensive grounds beside the River Stour. The estate has a long and fascinating history from the time of the Domesday Book, and for many centuries it was in the hands of the Shirley family. In the grounds you may also find the poignant ruins of a medieval church.

Remains of medieval church in the grounds of Ettington Park Warwickshire

Many strange tales are told of Ettington Park, both in the house and grounds. Numerous reports have been forthcoming, from guests and staff alike, of apparitions, dramatic drops in temperature, and other phenomena. Unsurprisingly the property also often receives the attention of paranormal investigators.

A view of the gothic mansion at Ettington Park (photo credit Jamie Robinson)

To all new visitors the house itself makes a powerful impact; certainly I found it to have a commanding presence, and not only is it a magnificent example of romantic architecture, but it bears that out fully with its strong atmosphere. This again is a property I greatly enjoyed researching, not least because of the highly-recommended afternoon tea to be taken here! (but sadly no paranormal events were experienced over the cakes and scones).

a view of the medieval church ruins at Ettington Park (photo credit Jamie Robinson)

Nevertheless many have given accounts of eerie events here.

Discover more about the strange events at Ettington Park in my book Paranormal Warwickshire.

Do check out my other posts in this series, which I began on 14th August 2020 with Shakespeare’s Ghosts and Spirits, and which brings us up to the publication date of my book Paranormal Warwickshire – 15th November 2020.

Warwick Castle

Guy’s Cliffe, Warwick

Gaveston’s Cross and the Saxon Mill, Warwick

St Mary’s Warwick

Kenilworth Castle

Abbey Fields, Kenilworth

Leamington Spa

Baddesley Clinton

Stoneleigh Abbey

Thomas Oken’s House and Lord Leycester Hospital, Warwick

Rugby locations

Nuneaton locations

The other posts in the series will cover the following locations:

The Royal Shakespeare Theatre, Stratford-upon-Avon

Holy Trinity, Stratford-upon-Avon

Coughton Court, Alcester

Glimpses of Paranormal Warwickshire Part 13: Nuneaton

This is the thirteenth in a series of glimpses into my new book Paranormal Warwickshire which will be published by Amberley Publishing on 15th November 2020.

George Eliot Hotel Nuneaton
George Eliot Hotel Nuneaton (photo credit Sheila Robinson). The great novelist George Eliot is celebrated in Nuneaton as she was born and brought up here.

My visits to Nuneaton have uncovered some truly astonishing stories. Nuneaton is strongly associated with the great novelist George Eliot, who lived there during the first part of her life, before she moved to London. She was inspired by the working people of Nuneaton and surrounding area. Her father was a land agent at Arbury Hall. She accompanied him on his business journeys to the hall and around the area, and she gained extraordinary insight into the hearts and minds of the working people as well as the aristocrats who lived in Arbury Hall.

Griff House Nuneaton
Griff House, Nuneaton, former home of George Eliot (photo credit Sheila Robinson)

George Eliot is considered among the greatest of all novelists. I love her books: Middlemarch is one of my all-time favourites.

Several curious tales are associated with one of the locations she would have visited: The Griffin Inn, just down the road from her former home.

The Griffin Inn Nuneaton
A view of The Griffin Inn, at Griff near Nuneaton, near to George Eliot’s former home – many curious tales are told of this inn

The most compelling stories emerge from among the working people in whom George Eliot was so interested: in this case, those who worked for decades in very unassuming commercial premises in Queens Road.

Commercial premises at 62 Queens Road Nuneaton
Commercial premises at 60-62 Queens Road Nuneaton, during the time they were occupied by Entertainment Exchange.

In fact I regard the anecdotes that emerge from the business owners and employees at 62 Queens Road as one of the most convincing paranormal sagas I’ve ever come across: simply because there have been so many individual witnesses, experiencing similar things quite independently of each other, over a number of decades.

Discover the full story in my book Paranormal Warwickshire.

Do check out my other posts in this series, which I began on 14th August 2020 with Shakespeare’s Ghosts and Spirits, and which brings us up to the publication date of my book Paranormal Warwickshire – 15th November 2020.

Warwick Castle

Guy’s Cliffe, Warwick

Gaveston’s Cross and the Saxon Mill, Warwick

St Mary’s Warwick

Kenilworth Castle

Abbey Fields, Kenilworth

Leamington Spa

Baddesley Clinton

Stoneleigh Abbey

Thomas Oken’s House and Lord Leycester Hospital, Warwick

Rugby locations

The other posts in the series will cover the following locations:

Ettington Park Hotel, Stratford-upon-Avon

The Royal Shakespeare Theatre, Stratford-upon-Avon

Holy Trinity, Stratford-upon-Avon

Coughton Court, Alcester

Glimpses of Paranormal Warwickshire Part 12: Rugby

This is the twelfth in a series of glimpses into my new book Paranormal Warwickshire which will be published by Amberley Publishing on 15th November 2020.

The Black Swan Rugby Warwickshire
The Black Swan in Chapel Street, Rugby Warwickshire (photo credit Jamie Robinson)

I knew little of the ghosts of Rugby until I joined a fascinating town tour one afternoon led by Matthew, an entertaining and well-informed raconteur. Those who had booked for the tour gathered outside The Black Swan pub in Chapel Street. We were all to discover a rich history and a wealth of colourful and curious paranormal tales.

Famous of course for its school, (founded by the Elizabethan merchant and philanthropist Lawrence Sheriff) and for the popular sport to which the town gave its name, Rugby is to be found in the pages of the Domesday Book of 1086, when it was an Anglo-Saxon hamlet known as Routbie.

Over the years, it slowly grew until, following the Industrial Revolution, the town experienced swift growth with the arrival of the railways. In 1838 an early part of the present West Coast Mainline was built around the town. Soon after that, many wagon works and engineering facilities were opened.

historical plaque Tew's the Butchers 14th century house Rugby Warwickshire
historical plaque Tew’s the Butchers 14th century house Rugby Warwickshire (photo credit Jamie Robinson)

A history tour of Rugby’s centre will provide a wealth of strange anecdotes. Several relate to the terrace of period properties in Chapel Street, foremost among which is the oldest house in Rugby, the 14th century building which once housed Tew’s the Butchers, famed for its appearance in the pages of Thomas Hughes’1857 novel Tom Brown’s Schooldays.

14th century house next to The Black Swan Chapel Street Rugby Warwickshire
14th century house next to The Black Swan Chapel Street Rugby Warwickshire (photo credit Jamie Robinson)

Other eerie and intriguing tales cling to the terrace of shops formerly occupied by the Lawrence Sheriff Almshouses in Church Street; the Rugby Theatre; a certain residence in Castle Street; and several buildings in the High Street, including the Lawrence Sheriff pub and two properties now occupied by retailers but which formerly served as locations for the Town Hall.

Finally several strange stories emerge from the memorial garden at St Andrew’s Church, and the gardens behind the church, an area which has a recorded history dating back to 1130 in the reign of King Stephen.

St Andrew's Church Rugby Warwickshire
St Andrew’s Church, Rugby

This magnificent church has stood at the heart of Rugby since the 14th century, with its west tower believed to be the town’s oldest structure. Here, in St Andrew’s Gardens, you may find many historical graves; and the land is believed to have formerly been occupied by a manor house protected by guards.

Rugby Theatre Rugby Warwickshire
Rugby Theatre Rugby Warwickshire (photo credit Jamie Robinson)

Do check out my other posts in this series, which I began on 14th August 2020 with Shakespeare’s Ghosts and Spirits, and which brings us up to the publication date of my book Paranormal Warwickshire – 15th November 2020.

Warwick Castle

Guy’s Cliffe, Warwick

Gaveston’s Cross and the Saxon Mill, Warwick

St Mary’s Warwick

Kenilworth Castle

Abbey Fields, Kenilworth

Leamington Spa

Baddesley Clinton

Stoneleigh Abbey

Thomas Oken’s House and Lord Leycester Hospital, Warwick

The other posts in the series will cover the following locations:

Nuneaton locations

Ettington Park Hotel, Stratford-upon-Avon

The Royal Shakespeare Theatre, Stratford-upon-Avon

Holy Trinity, Stratford-upon-Avon

Coughton Court, Alcester

You can pre-order Paranormal Warwickshire here.